Confessions of a Mediocre Widow by Catherine Tidd (Audiobook – Tantor Audio)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5-stars

**TOP PICK**

I have to admit that based on the cover I didn’t know this book was non-fiction. It quickly became apparent to me that it was. This is an emotional read that left me with a tear-stained face several times. It’s one of the best memoirs I’ve read thus far.

Brad Tidd, thirty-four, could not have known when he left his house one morning in 2007 that a single decision would immediately change his life, and then end it. Catherine, his wife, thirty-one, and the mother of their three small children, would spend her eleventh wedding anniversary planning her husband’s funeral. She details the agony of that experience, along with the surreal feelings that followed her husband’s sudden death and the ways it affected her life. She chronicles the many stages of grief she experienced, and she does it candidly and in a poignant, yet inspiring way.

Tidd talks about many pertinent aspects relating to the grieving process, and gives excellent advice to widows, as well as to friends, relatives and associates of widows, emphasizing what to say, what to avoid saying, and how to help. I found her advice very practical and beneficial since I’ve had the awkward experience of feeling at a loss for words when speaking with newly widowed friends. She recites her journey through the beginning stages of widowhood, and shares her experiences and feelings about dating, her in-laws, counseling, anxiety, the widow stigma and much more.

This book had a profound effect on me. As I listened to the author recount the sudden loss of her husband it shook me to my core and made me uncomfortable. It forced me to think about what it might be like to lose my own husband, or for him to lose me, a thought I try to avoid. My heart went out to Catherine because she was so young when it happened to her, and it was totally unexpected. Having to plan a funeral, deal with feelings of intense loss, raise three children under the age of five, alone, and become the sole breadwinner after having been out of the workforce for several years would feel overwhelming to anyone. And yet, she eventually confronted her fears, got her life in order and triumphed.

Confessions of a mediocre widow was gripping, moving and memorable. If you’re a widow, young or old, this book will likely resonate with you and stir up many raw emotions. If you have not yet come to terms with your widowhood status, this book might be a bit difficult for you to get through, but I can say confidently that it will be informative and affirming as well. For the rest of us, especially those who are married, if you read this book you will look at your spouse in a very different way. I felt the need to make a conscious decision not to take any days that I share with my husband for granted. Very highly recommended.

After reading this book, as regards the title, Confessions of a Mediocre Widow, I’m convinced that the author is anything but.

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Narrator – Celeste Oliva: I cannot think of a better narrator for this book. Celeste Oliva’s voice was composed, mellow, and pleasant to listen to; comforting, but not weak. Many times I had to remind myself that the voice was that of a narrator and not the author herself. She sounded so convincing, as though she was telling her own personal story. She was appropriately animated when necessary, which brought the author’s feelings to life. Excellent!!

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Thank you, Tantor Audio, for a complimentary download of Confessions of a Mediocre Widow. In exchange I have provided an honest review.

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Throwback Thursday – The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

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Throwback Thursday is hosted by Renee of It’s Book Talk.  This meme was created to share old favorites and/or books published over a year ago.  Today I’m going to be sharing an incredibly profound book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

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Why I chose this book:

This book was unlike any other I’d read.  I don’t read or post a lot of non-fiction books, but when I was perusing an independent book store while on vacation a while back, and it was on display and highly recommended to me by one of the workers, I decided to download the audiobook and listen to it.  I’d heard of it, but wasn’t sure what it was about.  O….M….Goodness.  I was blown away.  I couldn’t believe that Henrietta Lacks could have possibly affected my own life, and/or the lives of my loved ones.  My emotions were all over the place while getting through this book, but mostly I kept thinking this …

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Henrietta and her family were wronged in so many unimaginable ways.

Rebecca Skloot spent approximately a decade researching and writing this book before it was published.  It involves a young, underprivileged black woman who died of cervical cancer, but her cancer cells kept multiplying after her death in 1951, and they continue to live on in laboratories today.  They’ve been used to develop treatments and vaccines that many of us have probably benefited from.  Apparently the cells are so prolific that at last count they could wrap around the Earth several times.  But there’s much, much more to this story.  Although so many people, including medical professionals, profited from Henrietta’s cells, her family languished in abject poverty, some without medical insurance.  AND, consent from Henrietta or her family was never given to use Henrietta’s cells for research or otherwise.  See my more in-depth review here.

You might recall that the movie was released on HBO earlier this year.  Oprah Winfrey starred in it as Henrietta’s daughter, Deborah Lacks.  It was a good effort, but the book is exceedingly more detailed.  I recommend this book to the entire world.


Have you heard of, or read, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks?  What did you think?  I’d love to know your thoughts.

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Thank you for stopping by.  Have a wonderful day.