Silent Bud Deadly (Book 2: The English Cottage Garden Mysteries) by H.Y. Hanna

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 – 4.5 stars

When Poppy Lancaster inherited a cottage house and gardens she was thrilled, but maintaining her inheritance hasn’t come easy. She’s in need of some extra cash, so when a wealthy couple offers her a job sprucing up their garden for a generous amount of money, it’s an offer she can’t refuse. But when the nosy neighbor next door gets poisoned, Poppy wonders who could have murdered the meddling menace.

H.Y. Hanna’s cozy mysteries are always fun and addictive, and Silent Bud Deadly was no exception. I love how she effortlessly and cleverly weaves in the back story so that you won’t feel lost no matter where you enter the series. The recurring characters are a pleasure to revisit. I was glad to see that Bertie, Poppy’s neighbor who invents strange things that he tends to try out on unsuspecting people, was back in book 2. His antics brought many chuckles during the story. My favorite cat, Oren, the very vocal tabby, and its owner, the enigmatic writer, Nick Forest, were also present in book 2 to my delight.

I also learned much about various poisonous houseplants. Discovering something new while reading an H.Y. Hanna mystery is always a highlight.

Overall, this whodunnit was plausible and highly enjoyable. I definitely recommend this series, especially if you like intelligent cozy mysteries with fun, quirky characters and a great plot.

I Found You by Lisa Jewell

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4-stars

Alice Lake

Alice Lake is a middle-aged single mother of three boisterous children and three unruly dogs. Her home is a chaotic mess, but it’s warm and sufficient. She lives by the ocean and one day sees a strange man sitting outside on the beach in the rain, cold, with no jacket and looking bewildered. Curious, Alice approaches him, offers him a jacket and learns that the man has lost his memory. He doesn’t even know his name. Against her instincts and her children’s objections, she invites the lost man to stay in her vacant rental unit. He agrees. Who is this man and could he be dangerous?

Carl and Lily Monrose

Carl and Lily Monrose have been married three weeks before he up and vanishes one day. Lily knows something is wrong when he’s more than an hour late getting home from work. Carl is never late. He can’t wait to get home to her. Lily knows virtually no one where they live in England. They’ve lived there a short time, and she’s from Kiev, Ukraine, so she has no friends or family nearby to reach out to. The police are not taking her too seriously about her husband’s supposed disappearance. They figure she’s some mail order bride, and that her husband has gone off voluntarily. Lily waits the requisite period and when a policewoman finally fills out a report on Carl she’s slightly relieved. She hands over her husband’s passport for the police to inspect and goes home. But soon afterwards she receives a phone call with information that sends her searching for answers about her missing husband.

The Ross family

Gray and Kirsty are traveling with their parents to the same old cottage they’ve been going to for years on vacation. They’re teens now and would rather not go, but they have to. Gray observes how his sister is growing up into a young woman and he feels a brotherly affection for her; the need to look out for her and protect her from men who think like he does about attractive women. He sees how men look at his sister, especially the man called Mark Tate, who winds up in close proximity to them on the beach, close enough to charm Gray and Kirsty’s parents into coming over his aunt’s sprawling home, where he’s staying, for tea and cake. The parents immediately accept the invitation and Gray is furious. Mark’s eyes seem to linger on Kirsty, and Gray doesn’t like it one bit. What does this Mark character, who’s 19, want with his 15 year old sister?


These are the three narratives that play out in I Found You. Each storyline makes slight progress as the scenes revolve from one to the other. And then the three narratives converge into one jaw-dropping revelation.

I immediately started on I Found You after finishing my first Lisa Jewell book last week. It was so good I needed another, and this one did not disappoint. It had the right amount of suspense and kept me guessing throughout until the conclusion, when it all came together.

Between the two books, I enjoyed Then She Was Gone more than I did I Found You, because it wasn’t as raw and felt more plausible. However, you will get a well developed, excellently constructed suspense story with either one.

Thanks for visiting.

Deadhead and Buried (English Cottage Garden Mystery ~ Book 1) by H.Y. Hanna

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5-stars

When Poppy inherits Hollyhock Cottage and its adjoining garden from her deceased grandmother whom she never knew, she’s thrilled, albeit a little overwhelmed. Her current situation is that she doesn’t have her own place and she’s low on cash. If that weren’t bad enough, she’s impulsively quit her job after her unreasonable boss made a rude, insensitive comment, leaving Poppy in an even worse financial predicament. Fortunately, this inheritance has come upon her at the right time. However, there are stipulations that go along with taking possession of the property and Poppy feels unsettled about it. The cottage and garden have been neglected for some time and she’s far from having a green thumb. So how can she restore it and bring it back to its former glory? Poppy’s circumstances move her to take a chance on the old cottage and grounds. It’s a huge undertaking, but not more life altering than finding a dead body in the garden.

H.Y. Hanna has delivered another deliciously clever mystery with book 1 of her English Cottage Garden Mysteries series, Deadhead and Buried. I enjoyed this story immensely, having moved swiftly through it. I was caught up in the imagery of the cottage and surrounding garden, as well as the various plants and flowers that were named and described for me to envision. I learned about an exotic flower in this book, which I gained much joy from briefly researching. As is usual with an H.Y. Hanna mystery, the characters were interesting, quirky and fun, and there were pets to enjoy with their lovable antics and unique characteristics.

The audio narrator, Pearl Hewitt, is masterful in portraying both humans and animals. She adds so much delight to an already enjoyable, creative and plausible murder mystery. I highly recommend this book and look forward to the next one in the series.

Thank you, H.Y. Hanna, for a complimentary download of Deadhead and Buried. All thoughts expressed in this review are my own.

Death Over Easy by Maddie Day – Audiobook (Tantor Audio)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ – 4 stars

The Bill Monroe Bluegrass Festival in Beanblossom, IN, is underway, and Robbie Jordan, owner of Pans n’ Pancakes, is excited since the venue will provide opportunities for a few musicians and dancers to stay at her newly opened B&B. Her boyfriend, Abe, is one of the performers at the festival, and she feels proud watching him from the audience. But when she and other observers see him arguing with one of the band members, and then that same member is found dead the next day, Robbie gets involved in the investigation since the suspects include her boyfriend, her father and a couple of guests staying at her small B&B.

Death Over Easy is Book five in the Country Store Mystery series. I enjoyed it despite having absolutely no knowledge of bluegrass music, banjos and whatnot. One of my favorite things about this series is revisiting with recurring characters, particularly Lt. Buck Bird, a tall, lanky Detective with a bottomless pit appetite and a deep Hoosier accent.

I liked that several of the characters were potential suspects, and it was interesting how various characters had different opinions of the victim; some thought she was a great person, others thought she was awful. I kept trying to ascertain her true nature. And even though I had an inkling of who the murderer was fairly early on, it didn’t lessen my enjoyment of the story.

I had a niggle with the occasional instances of sexual innuendo in the book. It was unnecessary. And since the audio narrator had a very senior voice those instances sounded a little ridiculous. The flirty exchanges between Robbie and Abe sounded like an overgrown school girl with a dirty old man and it was not appealing.

An issue I had with the audio narrator, Laural Merlington, was that her voice was not that of a person in her twenties or thirties, which I believe was the age of the protagonist. She sounded, at the very least, to be a woman in her sixties, maybe even seventies. It’s not that the narrator wasn’t perfectly capable or articulate, it’s just that she sounded much older than some of the characters, and as a consequence I found it difficult to connect with some of them. I kept thinking to myself that she’d be a lot more convincing as the voice of Jessica Fletcher, or possibly the book (not movie) version of Agatha Raisin—but not Robbie Jordan. I’d wished I had a paperback copy in addition to the audio version so that I could switch up when her voice began to harass me.

All things considered, Death Over Easy was an enjoyable cozy mystery and I will be on the lookout for further additions to the series.

Thank you, Tantor Audio, for a free download of Death Over Easy. In exchange I have provided an honest review.

Thanks for visiting everyone. 🤗

Review: Death on the Nile

Death on the Nile
Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ THIS WAS AN AUDIOBOOK.  Linnet Ridgeway has stolen her best friend Jacqueline de Bellefort’s fiancé, handsome Simon Doyle, and has become Linnet Doyle to Jackie’s dismay and astonishment. Linnet already had everything as a wealthy heiress with brains and beauty. How could she deliberately set out to steal her best friend’s man and marry him?  Jackie was of meager means and Simon meant everything to her, so she seeks revenge by systematically stalking the new couple wherever they go, popping up and harassing them, including on their honeymoon vacation to Egypt. Jackie’s bent on making the couple miserable; punishing them for destroying her.  She even threatens murder, and that’s exactly what happens while the Doyles are on board a paddle steamship on the Nile River.  Linnet is shot dead and Jackie is the obvious suspect, only she has a solid alibi. Furthermore, as Hercule Poirot, who was also present during this trip, begins to investigate the murder he learns that Linnet had more enemies than just Jackie, and any one of them had motive for wanting her dead.

Death on the Nile was a clever mystery that was enacted orally in an entertaining way.  The story was full of colorful characters that kept me guessing as to whether any of them could have committed the murder. The fact that this was an audiobook made it a lively and fun listen, and I chuckled many times at the British characters and their humorous anecdotes and witty sayings. Listening to Hercule Poirot is always a joy, and watching his keen intellect put to action in solving crimes is the icing on the cake. This audiobook was a BBC radio full-cast dramatization that I bought as a $0.99 Daily Deal at Audible.com and I truly enjoyed it.  If you like relatively short mystery dramas (this one was 2.25 hours), Death on the Nile is definitely one to check out.

View all my reviews

Murder On The Half Shelf

Murder on the Half Shelf (A Booktown Mystery, #6)Murder on the Half Shelf by Lorna Barrett
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was a well written cozy mystery by author Lorna Barrett. It is the 5th or 6th book in the “BookTown” series, but can be read alone. I haven’t read a cozy in quite some time and almost forgot how fun they could be. This particular murder mystery involved a Bed and Breakfast proprietor who is found dead on the property not long after the guests arrive. There are a host of characters that I thought I’d have a hard time keeping up with throughout the book, but surprisingly I was able to remember mostly everyone who was mentioned. I attribute this to the author’s writing style. I think one of the reasons why I didn’t care to read cozies is because there are too many characters involved and it was too difficult trying to remember all of them. Now I realize that it may not be how many characters are involved, but the way the story is written that makes the difference. I liked the fact that any number of the characters could have been responsible for the murder, so I found myself musing about who and how any one of them could have done it. I liked reading about the town where the protagonist lived because it was made up of many delightful shops, including book stores which are my favorite. So overall this was a very enjoyable read and I look forward to reading more of Lorna Barrett’s mysteries.

View all my reviews