Review: Murder is No Accident

Murder is No Accident
Murder is No Accident by A.H. Gabhart
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

⭐⭐⭐💫 3.5 stars.
Young Maggie Green, 15, knows she has no business in Miss Fonda’s alluring Victorian mansion by herself. But she can’t resist. Even though the elderly Miss Fonda has invited her to come by whenever she wants, Maggie’s mother, who cleans the mansion with Maggie’s help, does not approve of her being there when they’re not working, especially since Miss Fonda is relegated to a gentle care facility now and the house sits empty. As young folks are sometimes prone to disobey their parents’ wishes, Maggie is inside the mansion in the tower room which is above the third floor, accessed by a trap door in the room beneath, making entries in her secret diary when she hears real estate agent, Geraldine Harper, entering the house. Careful not to be heard, Maggie stays still and quiet, hoping the well-known agent will leave shortly. But wait, there’s another set of footsteps heard in the house, and Geraldine hears them too. When she encounters the other intruder, a person she clearly knows, a conversation ensues and when Geraldine threatens to beckon the police, Maggie hears what sounds like someone tumbling down a flight of stairs. In fear, she waits a little while before leaving her hideaway and discovers the real estate agent dead at the bottom of the stairs. She calls 911 with Geraldine’s phone and sneaks away from the house unnoticed before the police arrive. Or did she get away unnoticed? In time Maggie becomes privy to not one murder, but two, and will she be able to keep herself out of harms way before the threats of a killer make her murder victim number three?

Murder Is No Accident is the first book I’ve read by A.H. Gabhart, and it was a pretty good mystery. What I liked most was the climactic ending. It was a different experience reading about a young teen discovering murder victims, as opposed to an adult. Some of the complexities that accompany mysteries featuring an adult protagonist is not present in this book, which was a little bit of a minus for me. The pacing started out slow but gradually picked up. It ebbed and flowed, with the ending reaching a crescendo. I think some of the parts in the beginning of the book made me feel as though it was written to appeal to an older demographic with the mention of dementia, strokes, accidents amongst the elderly, and the infirmities that are typically associated with aging. It was a little depressing, but thankfully those subjects didn’t prevail throughout the entire book. The sleepy town, Hidden Springs, where the murders took place, was comprised of quirky characters that tend to inhabit small, southern towns. A Deputy, Michael Keane, had a continual presence in the book, and the direction of his love life was somewhat of a secondary plot. I ultimately enjoyed how things turned out for him. The other characters made their appearances without much fanfare; sprinkled about here and there. Nothing particularly endearing about any of them besides Maggie and the boy who had a crush on her, Anthony. They were a sweet, innocent pair. Aside from them, there wasn’t a whole lot of character development that would make me long to read more about what happened to any of them in the future.

All in all, whereas the mystery aspect wasn’t bad, and the conclusion plausible, this was just an okay read for me. Others may really enjoy it. I just needed a little more excitement to keep me turning the pages, and that wasn’t the case for me.

Thank you Baker Publishing for an ARC of this book. In return I have provided an honest review.

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