Almost a Bride by Rula Sinara

💚💚💚💚 – 4 stars

Grayson and Mandi are meant for each other and even made it to the altar, but Mandi had second thoughts and jilted Gray there. Ouch!!

A few years later a sad occasion reunites them. Gray is deeply committed to his veterinary practice on the quaint island of Turtleback Beach in the outer banks of NC, while Mandi is set to start her new advertising career in NYC. Both are still fighting their feelings for one another, but Mandi is reluctant to get involved again with a reticent, guarded man who doesn’t seem to trust her. She’s unaware that Gray is in a witness protection program, and that disclosing this information could be deadly. Meanwhile, Mandi’s manipulative father dislikes Gray and is determined to keep the two apart. His meddling, though, could have disastrous consequences.

This second chance romance story tugged at my heart strings. I desperately wanted Gray to tell Mandi that he couldn’t open up to her because it would be too dangerous. That bit of conflict in the story kept me guessing how things would turn out for them. The clever way the revelation took place was highly satisfying. Gray was such a likable character; a vet who cared for sick and injured animals. Who couldn’t love a man with such tender compassion for animals and wildlife?

There’s a lot to love about Almost a Bride: lovable animals, hidden secrets, necessary lies and a HEA that will leave you feeling all happy inside. It’s always gratifying to read a book by Rula Sinara because you’ll almost always learn something new and exciting about animals and preservation, and that alone makes her books worth the investment.

Have a great week!! 😊

Review: Regretting You by @ColleenHoover #RegrettingYou #BookReview #ColleenHoover #NewRelease

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ – 5 stars

I loved this book!! I’ve FINALLY read a book by Colleen Hoover and I can see why readers love her. Regretting You pulled me right in and I became emotionally bonded with the characters through the rich narrative that so fully captured their personas. As I progressed through each chapter I was surprised by secrets, lies, misunderstandings and misinterpretations that kept me eager to press on. And then there was the sweet expressions of blossoming young love that had me all flushed and giggly and happy—reminiscing about what it feels like to be in love when you’re young and relatively carefree from the adult pressures of life.

Overall, Regretting You was a great story that I enjoyed with excellently developed characters and a delightfully satisfying ending that I highly recommend. Loved it!!


Goodreads summary

From #1 New York Times bestselling author of It Ends with Us comes a poignant novel about family, first love, grief, and betrayal that will touch the hearts of both mothers and daughters.

Morgan Grant and her sixteen-year-old daughter, Clara, would like nothing more than to be nothing alike.

Morgan is determined to prevent her daughter from making the same mistakes she did. By getting pregnant and married way too young, Morgan put her own dreams on hold. Clara doesn’t want to follow in her mother’s footsteps. Her predictable mother doesn’t have a spontaneous bone in her body.

With warring personalities and conflicting goals, Morgan and Clara find it increasingly difficult to coexist. The only person who can bring peace to the household is Chris—Morgan’s husband, Clara’s father, and the family anchor. But that peace is shattered when Chris is involved in a tragic and questionable accident. The heartbreaking and long-lasting consequences will reach far beyond just Morgan and Clara.

While struggling to rebuild everything that crashed around them, Morgan finds comfort in the last person she expects to, and Clara turns to the one boy she’s been forbidden to see. With each passing day, new secrets, resentment, and misunderstandings make mother and daughter fall further apart. So far apart, it might be impossible for them to ever fall back together.

I Found You by Lisa Jewell

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4-stars

Alice Lake

Alice Lake is a middle-aged single mother of three boisterous children and three unruly dogs. Her home is a chaotic mess, but it’s warm and sufficient. She lives by the ocean and one day sees a strange man sitting outside on the beach in the rain, cold, with no jacket and looking bewildered. Curious, Alice approaches him, offers him a jacket and learns that the man has lost his memory. He doesn’t even know his name. Against her instincts and her children’s objections, she invites the lost man to stay in her vacant rental unit. He agrees. Who is this man and could he be dangerous?

Carl and Lily Monrose

Carl and Lily Monrose have been married three weeks before he up and vanishes one day. Lily knows something is wrong when he’s more than an hour late getting home from work. Carl is never late. He can’t wait to get home to her. Lily knows virtually no one where they live in England. They’ve lived there a short time, and she’s from Kiev, Ukraine, so she has no friends or family nearby to reach out to. The police are not taking her too seriously about her husband’s supposed disappearance. They figure she’s some mail order bride, and that her husband has gone off voluntarily. Lily waits the requisite period and when a policewoman finally fills out a report on Carl she’s slightly relieved. She hands over her husband’s passport for the police to inspect and goes home. But soon afterwards she receives a phone call with information that sends her searching for answers about her missing husband.

The Ross family

Gray and Kirsty are traveling with their parents to the same old cottage they’ve been going to for years on vacation. They’re teens now and would rather not go, but they have to. Gray observes how his sister is growing up into a young woman and he feels a brotherly affection for her; the need to look out for her and protect her from men who think like he does about attractive women. He sees how men look at his sister, especially the man called Mark Tate, who winds up in close proximity to them on the beach, close enough to charm Gray and Kirsty’s parents into coming over his aunt’s sprawling home, where he’s staying, for tea and cake. The parents immediately accept the invitation and Gray is furious. Mark’s eyes seem to linger on Kirsty, and Gray doesn’t like it one bit. What does this Mark character, who’s 19, want with his 15 year old sister?


These are the three narratives that play out in I Found You. Each storyline makes slight progress as the scenes revolve from one to the other. And then the three narratives converge into one jaw-dropping revelation.

I immediately started on I Found You after finishing my first Lisa Jewell book last week. It was so good I needed another, and this one did not disappoint. It had the right amount of suspense and kept me guessing throughout until the conclusion, when it all came together.

Between the two books, I enjoyed Then She Was Gone more than I did I Found You, because it wasn’t as raw and felt more plausible. However, you will get a well developed, excellently constructed suspense story with either one.

Thanks for visiting.

Blog Tour: The Clergyman’s Wife ~ A Pride & Prejudice Novel by Molly Greeley – REVIEW

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 – 4.5 stars

In The Clergyman’s Wife we find ourselves intruding upon the lives of William and Charlotte Collins. This Pride and Prejudice-inspired novel begins a few years after Charlotte Lucas, Elizabeth Bennett’s cherished friend, marries awkward, harried Mr. Collins and settles down in the quaintly comfortable Hunsford parsonage in Kent. Charlotte, having hastily recommended herself for marriage to Mr. Collins when Elizabeth adamantly rejected him, has resigned herself to her melancholy existence as his wife. She’d perceived her marital prospects as slim given her lack of natural beauty and inconvenient social standing, which elevated her above the neighboring hopefuls thanks to her father’s favoring vanity over economic prudence, and now she recognizes the gravity of her impetuous decision. If this weren’t enough, their benefactress, Lady Catherine de Bourgh, of whom William Collins is ridiculously solicitous, diligently oversees nearly every aspect of their living arrangement, to Charlotte’s dismay. So when Charlotte witnesses her sister, Maria’s, excitement over her betrothal to the man she actually loves, irrespective of how their family or acquaintances view his humble profession of Apothecary, her own decision to settle for security over love leaves her with a degree of regret and sadness. Can anyone restore her initial grateful countenance?

Mr. Travis, a tenant farmer, has been commissioned by Lady Catherine de Bourgh, to beautify the Hunsford garden with roses. No botanist or gardener himself, but the son of one who painstakingly tended to the gardens of Rosing’s Park, Lady Catherine’s estate, Mr. Travis sets out to accomplish the task for which he’s been assigned. His work in the Hunsford garden necessitates regular visits to the Collins’ home of which Charlotte has grown accustomed. She is consciously aware of her anticipation of Mr. Travis’s visits and tries her utmost to appease herself with excuses for her imprudent feelings towards the man. Mr. Travis awakens her sensibilities in a way that her husband never has, and she is at once delighted by her thoughts and distressed by the impropriety associated with them. Charlotte is torn between loyalty to her well-meaning but emotionally distant husband and the anticipatory exhilaration in keeping congenial company with Mr. Travis. His apparent interest in her daughter, Louisa, her love of novels and sketching has enlivened Charlotte’s mundane existence, and has subsequently broadened her activities as a parson’s wife, impelling her to make visits upon the widows and elderly—bringing them gifts and conversing on a regular basis. Charlotte’s disposition has improved on account of Mr. Travis, and owing to this fact, her feeling of mortification and shame both chides her and spurs her on. What’s a loyal, morally upright woman to do?

If you loved Pride & Prejudice, or enjoy historical novels, you won’t want to miss The Clergyman’s Wife. Ms. Greeley’s melodious prose is descriptive and atmospheric; I could smell the damp leaves on the forest floor and hear the rustle of the dry leaves in the trees as the wind kicked up before a menacing downpour. I could see the Hunsford garden’s vibrant flowers swaying in the breeze while toddler, Louisa, squealed while frolicking. Events in the book evoked feelings of poignancy and mirth, and there was a nice balance between the two. The Mr. Collins and Lady Catherine de Bourgh characters so accurately embodied their familiar personalities from Pride and Prejudice that I found myself chuckling at their mannerisms and dialog, which was a real treat.

The Clergyman’s Wife is an even-paced, gentle read that elicits a feeling of longing to transport oneself back to the Regency era where gentility and propriety were the norm.

Thank you, William Morrow, for a free ARC of The Clergyman’s Wife, in exchange for my honest review, which I have given.

Thank you for visiting!

Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell **TOP PICK**

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ – 5 stars

This book kept me on the edge of my seat!! Here’s why…

Paul and Laurel’s daughter, Ellie, goes missing one day at the age of 15. She just disappears. Years later the effect of her disappearance has taken a toll on the family. Laurel is divorced from Paul, and their two other children, Hannah and Jake, have moved on with their lives, trying to put the past behind them. Laurel works a job a few days a week, visits her elderly mum in a nursing home and exercises regularly in order to keep some semblance of normalcy to her life. But then more devastating news comes, and Laurel struggles to find a way to keep going.

Things start looking up when Laurel meets Floyd and they begin a relationship. Floyd has two girls of his own; Sara Jade, 21, and Poppy, 9. Poppy is a precocious child who Laurel feels drawn to because of her resemblance to Ellie. Laurel might be on her way to finally putting her life back together. But then she begins to have doubts about her relationship and the man she’s dating. She’s not sure if she can trust him. She’s finding out things about Floyd that cause her to feel suspicious about him. Is he the man she thinks he is? Is her life in danger?

Then She Was Gone is psychological suspense at its best!! This was my first Lisa Jewell book and it was phenomenal!! The build up was intense, and I was thoroughly engaged in the narration from beginning to end. The characters were all very well developed and there was an amazing twist I didn’t see coming.

Regarding Lisa Jewell, I finally know what all the hoopla is about. She is an excellent writer!! I already started on another one of her books. I highly recommend Then She Was Gone.

Have you read any books by Lisa Jewell?

A Family of Strangers by Emilie Richards

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 – 4.5 stars

When Ryan Gracey gets an unexpected phone call from her older sister, Wendy, who’s out of town, asking her for a huge favor, Ryan is alarmed. Something sinister has transpired and Wendy insists that Ryan travel to her home and care for her two young daughters until further notice, a tall order from her near-perfect sibling, the mother of her two nieces of whom Ryan knows very little about. Stunned and confused by her sister’s instructions, Ryan finally relents and heads to Florida where their mother is currently watching her nieces, Holly and Noelle. The girls are taciturn, odd little precocious children, and Ryan quickly realizes the enormity of her decision. As days turn into weeks with very little contact from Wendy, Ryan begins to put her sleuthing skills to work to find out what’s going on with the sister she hardly knows. When the pieces of the puzzle begin taking shape will Wendy turn out to be an innocent victim, or a mastermind of deception?

Wowza!! I devoured this book. A Family of Strangers was like patiently awaiting a light rain transform into a thunderous storm. As the storm intensified I could feel the tension mounting and the mystery unfolding, relieving me of the unanswered questions that lurked in my mind. Why was Wendy refusing to come home? How would Ryan find out what happened to her? Was Wendy the golden girl everyone made her out to be, even her parents? Why were Ryan’s nieces so peculiar? As the story

unfolded I got the answers to all of these questions and more.

I connect easily with Emilie Richards’ writing voice. I love the dialog between characters, and the length of her books allows for excellent character development, which makes for a great story.

There’s so much to love about A Family of Strangers; excellent character building, a thoroughly satisfying mystery, an enormous twist I didn’t see coming, intrigue, a little romance, an amazing dog and a couple of kids who eventually stole my heart. A great read.

Thank you, Emilie Richards, for a complimentary ARC of A Family of Strangers in exchange for an honest review which I have given.

Have a great day everyone, and thanks for reading. 😊

Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery by Jenny Colgan (Audiobook – Tantor Audio)

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ – 4 stars

Polly Waterford has taken up residence in a four story lighthouse and oversees two bakeries for which she works many grueling hours and days per week, but wouldn’t have it any other way. She loves the thrill of observing the reactions of people from near and far gushing over her creations and forming lines to sample them. That feeling is worth more than all the money in the world. Besides that, she has her boyfriend, Huckle, to enjoy her spare time with; and of course, Neil, her pet puffin. Polly is feeling content with where she is in her life. But when Mrs. Manse, the owner of the little beach street bakery dies, the change in circumstances drastically affects Polly’s life and livelihood. And to make matters worse, a former acquaintance returns to Mt. Polbearne and Polly is incredulous to learn that they may soon be close neighbors—VERY close. This will put Polly in a very awkward predicament. She’s even feeling guilty about keeping Neil as a pet, regardless of his seemingly happy state. Pressures are mounting in every direction of her life. Much is at stake and Polly will have to make many difficult decisions to stay afloat financially. Can she navigate the many challenges she’s facing and regain everything she stands to lose?

I was excited to read Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery. I wanted to return to Mt. Polbearne, the little Cornish seaside town to see what my old chums were up to after having read The Little Beach Street Bakery and falling in love with the characters, the pet puffin, Neil, and the quaint picturesque resort town with the causeway that separates it from the mainland. I wasn’t disappointed. As I listened to the various trials Polly was facing in her life I admired how she persevered. She was uncertain and downright afraid about some of her choices, but she was determined to continue doing what she loved and her diligence paid off in the end.

I prefer the audio version of Jenny Colgan’s books because her books tend to be a bit long winded. She includes every thought, expression and action which translates well when I’m listening as opposed to reading. I learned this when I almost DNF’d the first of her books I’d tried reading before inadvertently switching to the audio version and enjoying it so much more. I’ve been a fan ever since. Although, I am disappointed that she tends to use expletives that are unnecessary and detract from the overall sweet tone of her stories that end on a happy note.

Audio narrator review:

Read by: Alison Larkin

Alison Larkin was pleasant to listen to and reflected Polly’s character and the tone of the story very well. It took some getting used to the voices of some of the male characters. A few were over animated and exaggerated and gave them a cartoon-like persona. They sounded a little dork-like to me, particularly the Dubose and Huckle characters. As the story progressed I finally became used to the sound of their voices and it was tolerable. Overall, a very good job with the audio.

Thank you, Tantor Audio, for a complimentary download of Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery. All opinions expressed are my own.